Month: July 2018

Getting Started with the Paleo Diet

by on / Paleo Diet

New Post has been published on https://www.healthierlife101.com/getting-started-with-the-paleo-diet/

Getting Started with the Paleo Diet

Getting Started with the Paleo Diet

The Paleo Diet has become one of the most popular weight loss programs – and for good reason. This diet is associated with eating a diet high in protein and free from refined carbs.

From elite athletes to people looking to improve their health, the Paleo Diet is a great choice. But is it right for you? Not everyone has the same preferences and needs, so let’s look at the basics of how it works.

Benefits of the Paleo Diet

The Paleo Diet has many benefits.  Most people who are beginning this program are looking to lose weight.  By changing your lifestyle to the Paleo diet you’ll make sure you have success in losing weight.

But there many other benefits of this program including:

  • Reducing inflammation in the body that can lead to chronic disease and aging
  • Better sleep
  • Higher energy levels
  • Hormonal balance
  • Decrease in gas and bloating
  • Improved cholesterol
  • Lower risk of heart disease, cancer, and diabetes
  • Reduction in allergies
  • Better muscle tone and fewer aches and pains
  • A feeling of improved mood

Who wouldn’t want to have these additional health benefits?  By following this simple program, you can feel better than you’ve ever felt before.  And while this plan may seem very different from the way you’re eating now, you’ll find that it’s actually simple to follow.

Paleo Basics

Before you can get started with the Paleo Diet, it’s important that you understand some of the basics about this program.  Paleo is short for Paleolithic.  This diet is also sometimes called the Cave Man Diet.

That’s because the premise of this program is that you eat like your ancestors who lived during prehistoric times. They were lean and toned because they used only the most natural foods for their body.

The idea is that they didn’t have the luxuries of processed foods including grains and factory meats.  Instead they hunted and gathered – eating mainly fruits, vegetables, nuts and wild meats.

So what can you eat on this diet?  You’ll be able to eat fresh fruits, vegetables, nuts, grass-fed meats, fish and other seafood, eggs, seeds, and healthy oils such as olive, flaxseed, and coconut oils.

It’s also best if you choose to eat organic foods as much as possible – since those are free from any pesticides, antibiotics, or herbicides that can actually be toxic for your body and cause inflammation.

Basically, you want to focus on eating whole, unprocessed foods that are as free from toxins as possible.  As you begin to follow the Paleo diet, you’ll see that it makes a lot of common sense and isn’t all that hard to practice.

There are foods that you’ll stop eating once you begin the Paleo lifestyle.  These include grains, dairy, potatoes, legumes (beans and peanuts), salt, refined vegetable oils (such as canola or soybean oils), refined sugar, and processed foods.

For some people, this isn’t a huge shift, but if you’re used to eating a lot of boxed or frozen dinners and fast food, then this is a drastic change.  You’ll find that there’s a bit of an adjustment period when you learn how to prepare foods differently and get used to new tastes.

An Easy to Follow Plan

While you’ll have to make some big changes, this diet is actually one of the least difficult to follow in many ways.  First, you don’t have to count anything.  You won’t need to track any calories, carbs, protein grams, or points.

You also don’t have to worry about eating at specific times or following any other arbitrary food rules.  As long as you’re eating whole foods and avoiding the foods that are off-limits, you’re following the plan.

Of course, you do also want to honor your level of hunger.  Even with healthy food, you don’t want to stuff yourself until you feel sick and miserable.  But you’ll find that there’s no need to feel hungry all the time – you can eat until you’re satisfied and listen to your body’s hunger cues.

Paleo Challenges

While in many ways, this program is simple to follow, it’s not without its challenges.  The greatest challenge comes from not having the ability to run into the gas station or a typical fast food restaurant when you need a convenient bite to eat.

You’ll be eliminating processed foods and for some people, that takes away a lot of the convenience and requires much more food preparation than they’re used to.

This diet can also cause you to increase your food budget. The processed foods that aren’t allowed on this plan tend to be much less expensive than organic or grass-fed products.

However, you’ll find that you get that investment back in good health and fewer medical bills. You may also have challenges when you’re dealing with the temptations of the office break room, a potluck dinner, and attending holiday parties.

But as you get past the first month or two of the program, those temptations become fewer. No matter what the challenge is, careful planning can help you have a better experience with getting started and with sticking to the program.

Preparing Your Pantry

One of the first things you need to do is prepare your pantry and kitchen for the Paleo diet.  That means getting rid of anything that’s processed or includes grains.

If you’re not ready to throw out food and waste it, consider donating it to a food bank. At the very least, if you don’t want to make a total commitment to this program, you should pack up the foods that aren’t part of the Paleo diet and ask a friend to store them for you.

Having those foods out of the house will make it easier to stick to the plan. You should also stock up on healthy foods to get ready.  In addition to having items for the meals you plan to eat, you need to make sure you have plenty of snacks to prevent you from getting too hungry in between meals and going off of the plan.

Some good examples include:  carrot sticks, beef jerky, herbal teas, a variety of nuts, applesauce, dried fruit, nut butters, and banana chips.  You’ll also want to stock up on common ingredients in Paleo recipes such as olive oil, coconut oil, unsweetened almond milk, maple syrup, almond flour, and coconut flour.

Having these staples on hand will make it easier for you to grab a snack and prepare the foods you need for success.

Make a Plan

When you’re getting started with this new way of eating, it really helps to have a plan.  How you plan depends on what works best for you.  But at the very least you should have a weekly meal plan.

This makes it easy to know what you’re going to eat for your meals rather than having to make last minute choices that could throw you off track.  Some people even prefer to plan further out – such as a 2 week or even one month plan.

For each day of your plan, you should have a breakfast, lunch, dinner, and two snack options.  You may not always stick perfectly to your plan, but having one will help you adhere to the Paleo diet most of the time.

One of the greatest causes of failure is not being prepared, so this one step could mean the difference between success and failure.  But once you’ve decided what to eat, you need to make sure you actually have what you need on hand.

Cook Once, Eat for a Week (or More)

When you’re eating using the Paleo lifestyle, you may find that you’re cooking a lot more than you once did.  But weeknights, it can be tough to cook after a long day of work, errands, and obligations.

One way to beat this problem is to cook once for the entire week.  And some people even choose to cook once for the entire month.  That means preparing meals and then refrigerating or freezing them to use later.


It’s much easier to stay true to the diet when all you have to do is come home and heat up something that you’ve already prepared.  If this sounds overwhelming to you, let’s break it down in a way that seems a little less intimidating.

All you need to do is take a look at your weekly meal plan.  Go grocery shopping for everything on the list the night before you plan to cook.  Then on cooking day, first do any chopping or other prep for vegetables and meats.

Next, start putting together the recipes and either putting them in a gallon size resealable bag to cook later or go ahead and cook them in the oven and reheat them later.

You can get an entire week’s worth of food prepared in three or four hours and be done cooking for the week.  But what if that is still too much for you?  Instead, you can just try to make each time you cook stretch a little longer.

Say you find a great recipe that you love.  The next time you make it, double the batch.  That way you can eat a meal that night and then you can have another serving of it later in the week or month.

All you have to do is put it in a container and pop it in the freezer – but make sure you label it so that you can find it again. If you do this a few times in a month, you’ll be able to get more out of the time you spend cooking in the kitchen.

Those extra meals are perfect for busy nights when cooking doesn’t seem doable, but you don’t want to grab a burger and go off of the plan.

Make a List of Go-To Convenience Foods

Even the most prepared people find that sometimes they’re out and about, hungry, and don’t have any snacks on them.  Keep a list on your phone, in your purse, or in your wallet of snacks that will work and are convenient.

Some ideas include deli meat, bananas, apples, beef jerky, nuts, hard boiled eggs, and dried fruit.  A salad without processed dressing can also be good – try squeezing a lemon on it for flavor.

You might also consider a can of tuna, Larabars (a commercial snack bar made from dates), guacamole and fresh veggies, and even a few squares of dark chocolate.

Eating out isn’t ideal when following the Paleo lifestyle, but you can do it from time to time without straying from good health. Just don’t be afraid to order your meal customized for your plan – they’re used to special requests.

Track Your Results

One way to stay motivated to get started and stick with the Paleo diet is to track your progress.  For some people, this will solely be based on weight loss.  But it’s a good idea to look beyond the numbers on the scale as you determine the effectiveness of the diet.

You can take photos of yourself at the beginning and then weekly to see if you can visualize any changes.  You can also keep a journal about your energy levels, any health problems that you’ve experienced, and generally how you feel.

Seeing problems improve and getting closer to your goals will help you stay committed to the Paleo diet – even when it’s tempting to give up.  The longer you do it, though, the better you’ll feel and the more results you’ll be able to document.

Seek Support and Keep Going

When you’re trying to overhaul your lifestyle, it can be tough to go it alone.  Seek someone to go on this journey with you and get a little support.  If you don’t have any friends or family members who want to try Paleo, you can always join online support groups.

It can really help to have someone else to share ideas and get tips for sticking to the diet.  Having a diet buddy can help you feel more committed and motivated to adhere to your healthy eating plan.

Changing your lifestyle can be a big challenge.  If you find that you eat something that isn’t part of the Paleo plan, don’t beat yourself up over it.  Just get right back to your healthful eating plan and move forward.

Feelings such as guilt and remorse when it comes to food will only keep you from being able to stick to the plan long-term.

Recommended Products For Paleo Diet

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[Discussion] Breaking up Biofilms

by on / Paleo Diet

Greetings peeps!

I’ve been chasing down the final nail in the coffin in this candida/biofilm for quite some time now. I’ve tested and confirmed I have biofilm. I also have a few physical tells, such as oral thrush, extra puffiness around my waist, and vertical lines in my thumbnails. Of course there’s a bit of brain fog, GI stuff with certain foods and fatigue.

Years ago I worked in a number of bars that were just disgusting. I cleaned the cooler out on a weekly basis for one bar, and I got bronchitis 3x in 6 months. Like, a full 2-3 weeks of bronchitis. It was mad house. Around the same time, I had antibiotics and crazy stress. Plenty of opportunity for fungi and bacteria to take hold, and Im certain that’s what did it.

I’ve seen a functional medicine practitioner, underwent a regiment of supplements and did some damage, but ultimately I feel like not enough focus was put on disrupting the biofilm. I’m determined to get it done so I can get on with my life.

So I’m hitting it hard.

Kirkman biofilm defense, NAC, digestive enzymes, monolaurin and probiotics.

Pau d’arco, ginger, oregano, chaga, reishi, cordyceps, ACV, chlorella, echinacea/goldenseal, grapefruit seed extract

I’ve been paleo/gluten free nearly 2 years, and that has helped tremendously. I can be loose at times with grains, as I tolerate soaked oats and small amounts of organic corn. For this, I’m cutting all yeast, grains, all dairy. Focusing on fiber, coconut oil and prebiotics. I’m a nutritional health coach, so I feel like I have that side locked down.

——————-

I’ll also be adding PEMF treatment after a few weeks.

PEMF info here: https://www.drpawluk.com/education/magnetic-science/new-pemf-start/

(This is good info, but I’m not using his products)

This is a pub med study on PEMF vs candida: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28238117

——————-

I’ll be focusing on drinking lots of water, getting lots of fresh air, long walks, yoga and kettle bells.

I’ll be using infrared saunas 1-2x a week

I’ll be dry brushing 1-2x a week

——————-

I plan on keeping this regiment steady for as many as 8 weeks, but might ease up around 6 if I feel I am making progress. I guess I’m curious if anyone here has fought a biofilm, in particular, and any tricks they used to slay the beast.

Any thoughts/notes are well appreciated.

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Ginger Sesame Zucchini Noodles with Shrimp

by on / Healthy Eating

image

Top these ginger sesame zucchini noodles with shrimp for a healthy summer dinner that’s ready in just 10 minutes. This recipe is also great served cold, so it’s perfect for meal prep!

Prep and Cook Time: 10 minutes   Serves 2

I haven’t been eating a lot of pasta lately, and I was even more excited about the idea of making it with zucchini noodles! I added some shrimp for protein and was really happy that such a healthy and delicious dinner could come together in just about 10 minutes.

How to make zucchini noodles

Zucchini noodles are easy, tasty, and go with just about anything, and zucchini noodles are exactly what they sound like – fresh zucchini that’s cut into long, noodle-like strands. Since zucchini doesn’t have a lot of flavor on its own, they take on the flavor of whatever you cook them with and they’re a fantastic low cal and gluten-free alternative to pasta. You can use a spiralizer or a box grater to cut them yourself (a great option in the summer when zucchini are cheap and plentiful!) or you can buy them pre-cut (look for them in the produce section.) I’ve also tried frozen zucchini noodles, but I don’t recommend them since they can be pretty soggy. Kathleen and I love them with red sauce and meatballs, in zucchini noodle pad thai, or sautéed with fresh herbs + hazelnuts.

You can boil them for a minute or two or sauté them. Or, you can eat zucchini noodles raw! That’s been my favorite way to enjoy them recently because they have a firmer texture, and it’s how I made these ginger sesame noodles.

Ingredients

  • 1 Tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil
  • ½ pound medium raw shrimp
  • 2 Tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 2 Tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and grated
  • 2 cloves garlic, grated
  • 2 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 Tablespoon sesame seeds
  • 1 pound zucchini, spiralized or cut

Directions

  1. Heat the oil in a large skillet set over high heat. Add the shrimp and cook 4-5 minutes, or until bright pink and cooked through.
  2. While the shrimp cook, combine the coconut aminos, sesame oil, ginger, garlic, green onions and sesame seeds in a large bowl. Add the zucchini noodles and toss to coat.
  3. Divide the zucchini noodles between two plates. Top with shrimp.

Ed Shepherd is the owner of KickBox-SuperFIT in West Palm Beach, Florida along with his brother Steve Shepherd a 5X world champion kickboxer.

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Shiitake Sesame Chicken Bowl

by on / Healthy Eating

image

The cruciferous vegetables, broccoli and Napa cabbage add an additional powerhouse of nutrients to your linch or dinner. Enjoy this Asian-style bowl. It’s a meal-in-one!

Optional: You can prepare ½ cup brown rice for this meal. Start cooking rice a few minutes before you begin cooking the meal. Follow directions on package for best results.

Prep and Cook Time: 15-20 minutes (not including rice cooking time)
Serves 1

Ingredients:

  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped or pressed
  • ¼ cup red onion, thinly sliced 6 TBS low-sodium chicken broth, plus more as needed
  • 2 tsp grated ginger
  • ¼ cup red bell pepper, diced
  • ¾ cup shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  • 3 oz chicken breast, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • ¾ cup scallions (green onion), cut into ¼-inch pieces diagonally
  • 1-½ cups broccoli, evenly chopped into ¼-inch pieces
  • ½ cup Napa cabbage, chopped into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 tsp rice vinegar
  • 1-½ TBS tamari soy sauce, plus more to taste
  • 2 TBS extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp toasted sesame seeds
  • Optional: red chili flakes to taste
  • Optional: Serve with ½ cup cooked brown rice.

Directions:

  1. Chop or press garlic, and slice red onions and scallions, and let them sit 5 minutes.
  2. Separate broccoli florets with small stems from large, thick stem.
  3. Finely chop florets and small stems into ¼-inch even pieces.
  4. Heat 3 TBS of the broth on medium high in a shallow stainless steel skillet with tight-fitting lid on.
  5. When broth begins to steam, add garlic, ginger, red onions, red bell pepper, and shiitake mushrooms and sauté for 2 minutes, covered with a tight-fitting lid.
  6. Next, add in this order: chicken, scallions, broccoli, Napa cabbage, remaining 3 TBS broth, rice vinegar, and tamari (and chili flakes, if using).
  7. Cover and steam over medium heat for 5 minutes.
  8. Do not stir or remove lid.
  9. Turn off heat, stir in 2 TBS extra virgin olive oil, and sprinkle with sesame seeds.
  10. If you are using rice, add that to a large bowl, and top with the vegetable and chicken mixture. Serve immediately.

Note: If you wish to use the large broccoli stem, cut off the bottom 1 inch of the stem. Peel the tough skin off the stem. Chop stem into ¼ inch pieces and cook with the rest of the broccoli.


Ed Shepherd is the owner of KickBox-SuperFIT in West Palm Beach, Florida along with his brother Steve Shepherd a 5X world champion kickboxer.

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Shiitake Sesame Chicken Bowl

by on / Healthy Eating

image

The cruciferous vegetables, broccoli and Napa cabbage add an additional powerhouse of nutrients to your linch or dinner. Enjoy this Asian-style bowl. It’s a meal-in-one!

Optional: You can prepare ½ cup brown rice for this meal. Start cooking rice a few minutes before you begin cooking the meal. Follow directions on package for best results.

Prep and Cook Time: 15-20 minutes (not including rice cooking time)
Serves 1

Ingredients:

  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped or pressed
  • ¼ cup red onion, thinly sliced 6 TBS low-sodium chicken broth, plus more as needed
  • 2 tsp grated ginger
  • ¼ cup red bell pepper, diced
  • ¾ cup shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  • 3 oz chicken breast, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • ¾ cup scallions (green onion), cut into ¼-inch pieces diagonally
  • 1-½ cups broccoli, evenly chopped into ¼-inch pieces
  • ½ cup Napa cabbage, chopped into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 tsp rice vinegar
  • 1-½ TBS tamari soy sauce, plus more to taste
  • 2 TBS extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp toasted sesame seeds
  • Optional: red chili flakes to taste
  • Optional: Serve with ½ cup cooked brown rice.

Directions:

  1. Chop or press garlic, and slice red onions and scallions, and let them sit 5 minutes.
  2. Separate broccoli florets with small stems from large, thick stem.
  3. Finely chop florets and small stems into ¼-inch even pieces.
  4. Heat 3 TBS of the broth on medium high in a shallow stainless steel skillet with tight-fitting lid on.
  5. When broth begins to steam, add garlic, ginger, red onions, red bell pepper, and shiitake mushrooms and sauté for 2 minutes, covered with a tight-fitting lid.
  6. Next, add in this order: chicken, scallions, broccoli, Napa cabbage, remaining 3 TBS broth, rice vinegar, and tamari (and chili flakes, if using).
  7. Cover and steam over medium heat for 5 minutes.
  8. Do not stir or remove lid.
  9. Turn off heat, stir in 2 TBS extra virgin olive oil, and sprinkle with sesame seeds.
  10. If you are using rice, add that to a large bowl, and top with the vegetable and chicken mixture. Serve immediately.

Note: If you wish to use the large broccoli stem, cut off the bottom 1 inch of the stem. Peel the tough skin off the stem. Chop stem into ¼ inch pieces and cook with the rest of the broccoli.


Ed Shepherd is the owner of KickBox-SuperFIT in West Palm Beach, Florida along with his brother Steve Shepherd a 5X world champion kickboxer.

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Sweetcorn and Broad Bean Fritters

by on / Healthy Eating

Author: desirefx

Sweetcorn and Broad Bean Fritters

Sweetcorn and Broad Bean Fritters
These colourful fritters are unbelievably delicious. They give you the impression of being substantial and really rather naughty, but leave you feeling light and bright.
serves 2
2 large eggs
100g (3 1/2oz/scant 2/3 cup) frozen sweetcorn, defrosted and drained
115g (3 3/4oz) frozen baby broad (fava) beans, defrosted and drained
50g (2oz/1/3 cup) rice flour
2 tbsp finely chopped coriander (cilantro)
1 bird’s eye chilli (Thai chilli), deseeded and finely chopped
Juice of 1 lime
¼ tsp Himalayan pink salt Freshly ground black pepper
Sunflower oil, for sautéing
For the dressing
2 tsp white miso
1 tsp agave syrup
1 tsp lemon juice
To make the dressing, whisk the ingredients together and set aside.
To make the fritters, whisk the eggs in a large bowl and add the sweetcorn and broad (fava) beans. Add the flour and stir well to combine. Add the coriander (cilantro) and chilli with the lime juice, season with the salt and plenty of black pepper, and stir in.
Heat a little sunflower oil in a large frying pan and, working in batches, cook spoonfuls of the mixture on both sides, until golden. Depending on the size you want, use 1 or 2 tablespoons of mixture for each fritter.
Serve the fritters with the Feta, Cucumber and Spinach Salad (see next recipe) and accompanied with the dressing.

Sweetcorn and Broad Bean Fritters

healthy recipes, Sweetcorn and Broad Bean Fritters

via TopHealthyEating https://ift.tt/2LPaIWY

Author: desirefx
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Sweetcorn and Broad Bean Fritters

by on / Healthy Eating

Author: desirefx

Sweetcorn and Broad Bean Fritters

Sweetcorn and Broad Bean Fritters
These colourful fritters are unbelievably delicious. They give you the impression of being substantial and really rather naughty, but leave you feeling light and bright.
serves 2
2 large eggs
100g (3 1/2oz/scant 2/3 cup) frozen sweetcorn, defrosted and drained
115g (3 3/4oz) frozen baby broad (fava) beans, defrosted and drained
50g (2oz/1/3 cup) rice flour
2 tbsp finely chopped coriander (cilantro)
1 bird’s eye chilli (Thai chilli), deseeded and finely chopped
Juice of 1 lime
¼ tsp Himalayan pink salt Freshly ground black pepper
Sunflower oil, for sautéing
For the dressing
2 tsp white miso
1 tsp agave syrup
1 tsp lemon juice
To make the dressing, whisk the ingredients together and set aside.
To make the fritters, whisk the eggs in a large bowl and add the sweetcorn and broad (fava) beans. Add the flour and stir well to combine. Add the coriander (cilantro) and chilli with the lime juice, season with the salt and plenty of black pepper, and stir in.
Heat a little sunflower oil in a large frying pan and, working in batches, cook spoonfuls of the mixture on both sides, until golden. Depending on the size you want, use 1 or 2 tablespoons of mixture for each fritter.
Serve the fritters with the Feta, Cucumber and Spinach Salad (see next recipe) and accompanied with the dressing.

Sweetcorn and Broad Bean Fritters

healthy recipes, Sweetcorn and Broad Bean Fritters

via TopHealthyEating https://ift.tt/2LPaIWY

Author: desirefx
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Do you ever just crave

by on / Healthy Eating

Author: hi-im-kelly

Do you ever just crave vegetables? Maybe I am weird because I do, but sometimes all I want is to eat the rainbow. Whenever I am looking for an easy way to pull a dish together, I create a stir fry. All you need is one pan, your favorite ingredients, and about thirty minutes of your time. This stir fry includes plenty of veggies along with tri-colored quinoa and chicken breast for added protein. It is the perfect weekly meal prep or week night dinner.

This week I had picked up some summer squash at the grocery store and decided to create some “squash noodles”. Although I don’t own a spiralizer, I found that it was just as easy and effective to use a peeler. The ribbons of squash cook quickly in a skillet and are incredibly easy to make.

I paired the squash with sliced red, orange and green cherry tomatoes, broccoli florets, scallions and fresh cilantro. These ingredients represent the colors of the rainbow and bring loads of flavor to the stir fry. For added protein I included my favorite tri-colored quinoa from Lundberg Organic and some chicken breast. Tr-colored quinoa is a summer favorite of mine.

I like to cook large quantities to keep in the refrigerator and add to salads or enjoy as sides to my dinners. It is such an easy way to make any meal heartier and keep you feeling full and satisfied. Chicken is another protein I like to cook and bulk and add into my meals for protein. For this recipe I diced the chicken breast into cubes and sautéed them in olive oil with a bit of garlic.

Print this recipe out to add into your cook book or save for later on Pinterest!

Rainbow Summer Stir Fry

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 large summer squash
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes
  • 2 cups diced chicken breast (or however much you feel like)
  • 1 cup broccoli florets
  • 1 cup cooked tri-colored quinoa
  • 2 diced scallions
  • cilantro (to taste)
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp diced garlic
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • pepper
  • Himalayan pink sea salt
  • Paprika (to taste)
  • Directions
  1. Heat a medium sized skillet on medium heat and add 1 tbsp of olive oil. Let the pan sit for a minute before adding the diced garlic. Dice the chicken breast and add to the pan once the garlic becomes fragrant, stirring until the chicken is fully cooked.
  2. In a small sauce pan, heat 1 cup of tri-colored quinoa and 1.5 cups of water. Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Cook the quinoa for 15-20 minutes or until it is fluffy and the water has been burned off.
  3. Once the chicken is cooked, remove from the pan and set aside. Add the other tablespoon of olive oil to the pan and let sit while you peel the summer squash. Once you get down to the seeds feel free to dice the remainder and add it into the stir fry.
  4. Heat the summer squash until it begins to wilt, then add in the broccoli, sliced tomatoes and scallions. Season with salt and pepper and add optional paprika. Once the broccoli and tomatoes are nice and bright, take the stir fry off of the heat and set the pan aside. Add in the soy sauce and mix evenly with the vegetables. Be mindful to not overcook the vegetables or the stir fry will get very mushy.
  5. Mix in the cooked quinoa and chicken, adding any additional seasoning until you find your desired taste. Top with fresh cilantro and enjoy!

http://www.hiimkelly.com

Enjoy!

Rainbow Summer Stir Fry

Do you ever just crave vegetables? Maybe I am weird because I do, but sometimes all I want is to eat the rainbow.

Author: hi-im-kelly
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Do you ever just crave

by on / Healthy Eating

Author: hi-im-kelly

Do you ever just crave vegetables? Maybe I am weird because I do, but sometimes all I want is to eat the rainbow. Whenever I am looking for an easy way to pull a dish together, I create a stir fry. All you need is one pan, your favorite ingredients, and about thirty minutes of your time. This stir fry includes plenty of veggies along with tri-colored quinoa and chicken breast for added protein. It is the perfect weekly meal prep or week night dinner.

This week I had picked up some summer squash at the grocery store and decided to create some “squash noodles”. Although I don’t own a spiralizer, I found that it was just as easy and effective to use a peeler. The ribbons of squash cook quickly in a skillet and are incredibly easy to make.

I paired the squash with sliced red, orange and green cherry tomatoes, broccoli florets, scallions and fresh cilantro. These ingredients represent the colors of the rainbow and bring loads of flavor to the stir fry. For added protein I included my favorite tri-colored quinoa from Lundberg Organic and some chicken breast. Tr-colored quinoa is a summer favorite of mine.

I like to cook large quantities to keep in the refrigerator and add to salads or enjoy as sides to my dinners. It is such an easy way to make any meal heartier and keep you feeling full and satisfied. Chicken is another protein I like to cook and bulk and add into my meals for protein. For this recipe I diced the chicken breast into cubes and sautéed them in olive oil with a bit of garlic.

Print this recipe out to add into your cook book or save for later on Pinterest!

Rainbow Summer Stir Fry

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 large summer squash
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes
  • 2 cups diced chicken breast (or however much you feel like)
  • 1 cup broccoli florets
  • 1 cup cooked tri-colored quinoa
  • 2 diced scallions
  • cilantro (to taste)
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp diced garlic
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • pepper
  • Himalayan pink sea salt
  • Paprika (to taste)
  • Directions
  1. Heat a medium sized skillet on medium heat and add 1 tbsp of olive oil. Let the pan sit for a minute before adding the diced garlic. Dice the chicken breast and add to the pan once the garlic becomes fragrant, stirring until the chicken is fully cooked.
  2. In a small sauce pan, heat 1 cup of tri-colored quinoa and 1.5 cups of water. Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Cook the quinoa for 15-20 minutes or until it is fluffy and the water has been burned off.
  3. Once the chicken is cooked, remove from the pan and set aside. Add the other tablespoon of olive oil to the pan and let sit while you peel the summer squash. Once you get down to the seeds feel free to dice the remainder and add it into the stir fry.
  4. Heat the summer squash until it begins to wilt, then add in the broccoli, sliced tomatoes and scallions. Season with salt and pepper and add optional paprika. Once the broccoli and tomatoes are nice and bright, take the stir fry off of the heat and set the pan aside. Add in the soy sauce and mix evenly with the vegetables. Be mindful to not overcook the vegetables or the stir fry will get very mushy.
  5. Mix in the cooked quinoa and chicken, adding any additional seasoning until you find your desired taste. Top with fresh cilantro and enjoy!

http://www.hiimkelly.com

Enjoy!

Rainbow Summer Stir Fry

Do you ever just crave vegetables? Maybe I am weird because I do, but sometimes all I want is to eat the rainbow.

Author: hi-im-kelly
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Beefed-Up Tomato Soup

by on / Gluten Free

Author: no-more-ramen

This recipe doesn’t have any beef in it, but it does make it a lot heartier! It also makes it feel like homemade with half the effort and is an excellent way to use up the spinach in the crisper you bought in a fit of good intentions which is no longer usable for salad. Also a good way to use up a bunch of tomato paste if you had to open a can and then only use a tablespoon.

Supplies:

– pot
– spoon/spatula
– you can use measuring stuff if you want but honestly it’s soup so you can just guesstimate if you like
– bowl and spoon for eating

Ingredients:

– 1 small to medium onion, diced as rough or as fine as you care to eat your onions
– 1 clove garlic, minced (optional but exellent)
– 10-15 mls olive or other vegetable oil (2-3 tsp)
– 2 ml salt (½ tsp)
– 1-2 mls pepper flakes (leave out if you’re not okay with spice, or replace with hot sauce later in the process) (¼ to ½ tsp)
– 1 can tomato soup
– 1 soup can’s worth of milk (or alternative; just don’t, for the love of God, use water unless you absolutely must)
– 10 mls Italian spice mix (2 tsp) (if you don’t have it, use:
– 2 mls basil (½ tsp)
– 2 mls oregano (½ tsp)
– 1 ml rosemary (¼ tsp)
– 1 ml thyme (¼ tsp)
– 2 mls onion powder (½ tsp) (don’t leave it out just because you already have onion in the soup, I swear it adds something different)
– 1 ml garlic powder (¼ tsp)
– .5 mls black pepper (1/8 tsp)
– if you have it, 2 mls fennel (½ tsp)
– if you have it, 1 ml marjoram (¼ tsp)
– hot sauce to taste
– 15-45 mls tomato paste (1-3 tbsp)(also optional but also excellent)
– a few handfuls spinach or kale
– 125-250 mls cooked rice (½-1 cup)

Directions:

Add the oil to a pot and heat to medium low (3 or 4 out of 9 on my stove, don’t go too high). Dump your onions, garlic, salt, kale if you’re using it, and pepper flakes if you want them and let it sit for ~5 min. You can stir if you want, but you don’t have to, because…

Dump in the tomato soup and a can’s worth of milk. Scrape up the bottom with your spoon/spatula when you stir and the excellent little brown bits will become part of your soup.

Add the Italian spice mix or the spices in the amounts listed. This is where you’d also add your hot sauce if you wanted spice but didn’t have pepper flakes, or if you’re crazy and wanted both. Add your tomato paste if you’re using it and stir fairly vigorously, it’s weirdly thick.

Add your spinach and let it sit.

Once your spinach/kale is as wilted as you want it to be, add your cooked rice and turn off the heat. Cover it and leave for about a minute to heat the rice up, then taste to see if it needs more salt – depending on what soup brand you’re using, it might, so add it if it does. Then serve!

Author: no-more-ramen
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